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Guelph, ON
Canada

Grizzly Bear Coffee is a small coffee roaster in Guelph, roasting coffee in small batches using fair trade, organic green beans from around the world using sustainable energy.

My aim is have a coffee resource in Guelph that is personal, friendly and as fresh as can be.

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Grizzly Bear Coffee is Joe Harrison, a coffee roaster in Guelph, roasting coffee slowly, in small batches using fair trade, organic green beans from around the world using sustainable energy. My aim is have a coffee resource in Guelph that is personal, friendly and as fresh as can be. 

 

The Pour Over

Grizzly Bear Coffee

This is pretty much the easiest way to brew a solid cup of coffee.  If you use fresh roasted coffee and as your develop your technique, you’ll get a clean tasting cup of coffee.  The Hario V60 is from Japan and should set you back $20 and is available in different sizes, colours and material.  I prefer the ceramic.  If you need to purchase one, I can hook you up.

What You'll Need:

  1. Hario V60 dripper (or something similar)
  2. Filter - You can use a No. 4 Filter or Hario’s filter. Hario does not have a flat bottom but goes to a ‘point’ which is supposed to be better
  3. 25g of ground coffee  I use medium-fine grind and depending on how accurate i want to get, I’ll use a scale.  Otherwise I just grind about 3 tbsp.
  4. A Kettle
  5. Cold Water. Use filtered water for best results.
  6. A Digital Scale. Not really necessary but if you’re serious (and you probably are if you’re reading this) it’s a good idea to have one - especially the first few times.
  7. Your favourite mug.  I pour mine into a glass pitcher first so I can see how much I have brewed

Let's Get Started;

  • Start boiling your water using cold filtered water.  Water is an essential ingredient in coffee so make sure it’s good stuff.  In Guelph we have pretty hard water with lots of calcium so I like to filter it first.  Saves my kettle too.
  • Weigh and grind the beans.  I like to use 25g of coffee usually depending on the coffee I’m using as well how strong I want the cup to be.
  • Set your grind to a medium-fine setting.  Burr grinder is recommended but if don’t have one, try to grind your beans to a medium-fine setting, about the size of gritty sand or kosher salt. Don’t put the coffee in the filter yet!
  • When the kettle boils, take it off the heat and let it sit for about 10 seconds to bring the temperature down a bit. (about 90-96ºC)
  • Putthe filter in the cone and set the dripper on top of your cup.  Here we go. Don’t put the coffee in the filter yet!
  • Get rid of any impurities and gunk on the filter by pouring a little water around and through it.  This will also preheat your cup or container!  Once it’s damp make sure to pour the water out of the cup.
  • Now put the coffee grounds in the filter.  If you have a scale, put your cup on the scale along with the dripper, and tare it (set it) to 0.
  • Slowly pour out about 50g of water onto the grounds.  Then wait about 30 seconds to 1 minute.  tip - the fresher the coffee, the less you have to let it bloom.
  • After it blooms, pour some more water into the dripper.  Make sure to use a small, circular motion and try not to let the water pour directly onto the filter.  Water can go up to about 2 cm from the top.
  • Let the brew finish after you have added about 100g of water.  Enjoy your coffee!